KeenBrace will guide runners and weightlifters through their workouts

The wearable coach will offer real time feedback and muscle mapping
KeenBrace guides runners and weightlifters

Looking to join the bevy of real time coaching wearables hitting the scene, startup KeenBrace has developed a device that will coach you through both running and strength exercises.

The device offers muscle-mapping technology and can be worn on the arm, forearm or thigh in order to track everything from your push-ups and squats to running and bicep curls. The aim is to not only help you maintain your form and coach you toward goals through the tracking, but also prevent injuries.

Read this: Best gym trackers and wearables

But just how does it all work, and what tech is being used to track such a range of exercises?

Well, according to the company, both muscle activation and fatigue are monitored through a surface electromyography (SEMG) to provide feedback. So, for example, when out running, this could lead you to be prompted to change how you land.

The device is currently doing the rounds on Indiegogo, with backers able to back the project from $59 — a healthy cut from its eventual retail price of $149. Since two KeenBrace devices can be worn simultaneously, though, in order to provide more detailed feedback, there's also the option to double up and pick up the $119 option. If it's able to reach its funding goal of $25,000, the devices are scheduled to ship in November.

Of course, KeenBrace isn't competing on empty soil within this field; devices like the Moov Now and Atlas Wristband both offer similar functions for runners and gym-goers, respectively. Where KeenBrace potentially offers an edge, if its tracking proves up to scratch, is in its ability to appeal to both the weightlifter — where options are thinner — as well as those who enjoy pounding the pavement.

For now, it'll simply be aiming to keep the ball rolling past its crowdfunding campaign.

KeenBrace will guide runners and weightlifters through their exercise




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