Amazfit drops GTR 3 Pro with blood pressure – along with new GTS/GTR 3

Big update keeps Amazfit in the race
Amazfit drops trio of new smartwatches
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Amazfit has launched a huge upgrade to its smartwatch line-up, with the release of its new GT 3 range.

It’s led by an all-new device from Zepp Health – the GTR 3 Pro. That joins the traditional twosome of the GTR 3 (round) and GTS 3 (square) smartwatches.

Let’s start with the GTR 3 Pro, which retails for $229 – a significant increase from Amazfit’s usual pricing.

The GTR 3 Pro boasts a round display, but manages to cram in a 1.44-inch AMOLED display, into a package the same size and weight as the 1.39-inch standard GTR 3.

Both the GTR 3 and 3 Pro are much sleeker than the GTR 2, with a rounded case and more refined design. And the top crown can now twist to control on-watch menus.

Amazfit labels the display an "Ultra HD" 480 x 480 display, which admittedly is pretty damn high – and up there with the likes of the TicWatch Pro 3 Ultra and Galaxy Watch 4. It does offer a marginally higher PPI than the GTR 3 at 331ppi. It's a gorgeous and sharp display, and perhaps overkill for the minimal Zepp OS, which certainly favors white text on black backgrounds.

Amazfit drops GTR 3 Pro – along with new GTR/GTS 3 smartwatches

It also has a screen-to-body ratio of 70% – so you get more real-estate for your money.

The BioTracker 3.0 runs the show in terms of heart rate tracking, which is an upgrade on 2020’s BioTracker 2.0. It’s responsible for heart rate, blood oxygen, breathing rate and stress level detection.

There's also a blood pressure monitor which feels like quite big news despite lack of fanfare from Zepp Health. It needs to be calibrated to a cuff. We'll be testing this out in our review.

And you can do a one-tap measure of key biometric data, which will record your heart rate, breathing rate and SpO2 in one scan.

And the Pro version adds a speaker, Wi-Fi, music storage and Bluetooth calls for the first time – and these features aren’t available on the GTR 3 or GTS 3.

Elsewhere, it’s more of the same Amazfit features. There’s auto-detection for eight sports, and 150 workout profiles, GPS, the PAI heath fitness score, menstrual tracking, support for Strava, Apple Health, Google Fit and Runkeeper – and built-in Amazon Alexa.

And runners have got a big new feature, with the ability to virtually race your own routes, and try and beat your previous efforts.

The 450mAh battery will power the GTR 3 Pro for a quoted 12 days – bested only by the GTR 3 as we’ll come on to next.

GTR 3 and GTS 3

Amazfit drops GTR 3 Pro – along with new GTR/GTS 3 smartwatches

The GTR 3 Pro kind of eclipses the duo of the GTS 3 and GTR 3 – which do have unique selling points beyond their shape.

Both the GTR 3 and GTS 3 replace the standard GT 2 smartwatches, and again feature incremental updates.

The GTR 3 offers the same 450mAh battery as the Pro version, but can last 24 days between charges, according to Amazfit. It’s smaller at 1.39-inch, and has lower display-case ratio, so there's more bezel and a smaller display.

The square-faced Amazfit GTS 3 is designed for those looking for the best screen going. It packs in a 1.75-inch AMOLED display, with a 72% screen/case ratio and the highest PPI at 341ppi. It’s also the lightest at 24g.

The standard GTR 3 and GTS 3 miss out on the speaker, Wi-Fi and ability to make calls from the wrist – but otherwise have the same excellent feature set, with GPS, 150 sports modes and the BioTracker 3.0 all on board.

They retail for $179.99 each – and just like we commented on the launch of the GTS 2 – it does feel quite hard to justify spending $229 on the Pro when the extra features feel quite marginal. There’s no word on whether Amazfit will release a GTS 3 Mini, but it seems odds on.

It’s a fairly iterative update of the GTR/GTS range, which have long been favorites here at Wareable, for those looking for a great mix of features and price. The hardware changes here do look like a decent improvement – but we’d like to see the Zepp app and Zepp OS mature to become great smartwatch companions.