Stryd Live is a foot pod sensor built for Zwift running

New foot pod strips back the metrics and the price
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Stryd, makers of one of the first power meters for runners, has launched another foot pod sensor. This time it's ditching the ability to measure power from down low and has designed the wearable to be used with Zwift's new virtual running software.

Unlike the standard Stryd, it loses the ability to measure some of the more advanced running metrics, which include leg stiffness and the all important power metric. That also means it lacks Stryd insights too. Instead it focuses on measuring pace, distance, vertical oscillation and ground contact time.

Essential reading: A quick guide to running power meters

The pod has been specifically designed to work with Zwift, who recently launched Run Free Access, which offers runners the ability to train indoors on a treadmill in the same virtual worlds that has been available to cyclists for a few years now. This pod is your means to pair it to the software to track running activity in the experience.

The only other feature that differentiates the two foot pod sensors is the fact that the Stryd Live uses wired USB charging. The Stryd Live costs $100, which is $100 less than the more data-rich Stryd. It does mean it's still more expensive than the MilestonePod foot pod sensor, which is also optimised to work with Zwift Run Free Access and is a much cheaper option at . So it's a bit surprising that Stryd hasn't gone lower on the price.

If you're into the idea of virtual running, the Stryd Live is available to buy now from the company's website. It's a limited edition version apparently, so it sounds like there'll only be a certain amount up for grabs if you want one.

WareableStryd Live is a foot pod sensor built for Zwift running




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Michael Sawh

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Michael Sawh has been covering the wearable tech industry since the very first Fitbit landed back in 2011. Previously the resident wearable tech expert at Trusted Reviews, he also marshaled the features section of T3.com.

He also regularly contributed to T3 magazine when they needed someone to talk about fitness trackers, running watches, headphones, tablets, and phones.

Michael writes for GQ, Wired, Coach Mag, Metro, MSN, BBC Focus, Stuff, TechRadar and has made several appearances on the BBC Travel Show to talk all things tech. 

Michael is a lover of all things sports and fitness-tech related, clocking up over 15 marathons and has put in serious hours in the pool all in the name of testing every fitness wearable going. Expect to see him with a minimum of two wearables at any given time.


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