​Apple Watch Series 7 set for new screen tech in new rumors

Hardware changes for Series 7 looking likely
Series 7 set for new screen tech
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The Apple Watch Series 7 could be set to get new screen tech, with less bezel and more real-estate, according to a new report.

The details have appeared from Bloomberg, which regularly drops supposed insider information from people familiar with the matter.

According to the report, Apple has tested new screen tech that will allow for thinner borders thanks to a new “lamination” technique.

Apple leaker Jon Prosser has released renders (see below) based on designs he’d supposedly been leaked, that appeared to show a whole new case design for the Series 7, which used flat edges that match the updated iPhone and iPad design language. There’s no mention of that here, but it seems that the Series 7’s appearance will change.

And controversially, Bloomberg says that the Series 7 will get a tad thicker – although that will be imperceptible to wearers.

Update: The Apple Watch Series 7 is now official. Read our guide for everything you need to know.

Apple Watch Series 7 set for new screen tech

Apple is allegedly bringing new ultra wideband functionality – which is not surprise given it’s a major part of watchOS 8’s feature set. This enables the Apple Watch to work for keyless entry for cars and hotels.

The report also alleges that Apple is working on some innovations that won’t make it to this year’s launch.

The rugged Apple Watch that Bloomberg leaked earlier this year will not be until 2022 (supposedly).

As will a new temperature sensor – a feature that’s been landing on smartwatches such as the Fitbit Sense, Huawei Watch 3 and Amazfit GTR 2e this year.

The report also alleges Apple is working on glucose monitoring – which is a few years off. That’s no surprise, given our recent investigation into the future of blood glucose monitoring showed the technology is far from proven – and may not even be possible with current sensors.