Fitbit is in talks with the NHS about a fitness tracker scheme

But how would the wearables be used?
Fitbit is in talks with the NHS

Fitness tracker giant Fitbit could soon work in partnership with the NHS in the UK, with talks between the pair taking place recently.

CEO James Park has said that conversations over a deal with the NHS are underway, though no firm plans have yet been agreed.

The tech firm already has a similar relationship with US health insurer United Healthcare, in which people can save money on devices through hitting certain exercise goals and allowing their data to be monitored. If Fitbit and the NHS were to work together, a similar premise could hit the UK, according to Park.

Read this: How wearables will connect the hospital of the future

This tidbit also comes after health secretary Jeremy Hunt noted last September that the NHS would be making "very big moves" into apps and wearables over the course of 2017 - something we have already seen come to fruition.

The health service recently began trialling Snap40, a health wearable worn on the upper arm which continuously monitors hospital patients' vital signs, while NHS England now recommends specific health apps to patients.

If the pair do finalise a tie-up, just which metrics would be tracked is hard to pin down. While tracking step goals can be a strong initial motivator, for example, the benefits of monitoring this are likely limited. With sleep tracking and general wellness soaring up Fitbit's agenda, though, this could potentially be used to track patients' recovery.

On the surface, a deal would would make sense for both sides, so don't be surprised if we hear more news about this in the coming weeks and months.

Via: The Times

Fitbit holds talks with the NHS


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1 Comment

  • _gh_ says:

    This is such a bad idea.  It's a good idea for fitbit; a nation of 50+ million with a single health care provider.  The converse is of course "having" to provide data, the risk of treatment programs being predicated on nationally defined exercise levels without recourse to individual circumstances.

    From the other end, as someone who has worn 7 fitbits (2 charge and 5 surge)  over the course of the last 22 months and now sporting a Garmin they are not robust enough if used and worn 7*24.  Fitbit has an awesome customer service system to replace damaged (through normal use) fitbits.  I has an awesome website for reporting.  It does not yet make devices robust enough to be worn continuously.

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