Fujitsu creates new wearable sensors to help the elderly

But we're still in love with its wearable helmet camera
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Fujitsu has created a stamp sized wearable sensor, which can detect falls or changes in temperature.

The company has been quietly innovating in internet of things tech (IoT), and hopes the sensors will be used for workers in the construction and infrastructure industries who work in hazardous areas, or ensuring the safety and wellbeing of older people.

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The tags use Bluetooth Low Energy to transmit continuous data on their position and environment, and are stuffed with sensors, making them some of the most capable on the market.

Increased sensor capability is going to be a big trend over the next year, with Stacey Burr, the head of wearable devices at Adidas, confirming that getting devices to capture more data was a focus in the consumer sphere.

Fujitsu has been busy creating an IoT platform called Ubiquitousware, which is designed to help businesses use and monitor connected devices.

Last year we reported that Fujitsu was working on a wearable head mounted camera and a smart ring, which feature promising tech – even if the photos are slightly hilarious.

Check out our round-up of top IoT concepts from Digital Shoreditch in London.

Source: Computer World

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James Stables

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James is the co-founder of Wareable, and he has been a technology journalist for 15 years.

He started his career at Future Publishing, James became the features editor of T3 Magazine and T3.com and was a regular contributor to TechRadar – before leaving Future Publishing to found Wareable in 2014.

James has been at the helm of Wareable since 2014 and has become one of the leading experts in wearable technologies globally. He has reviewed, tested, and covered pretty much every wearable on the market, and is passionate about the evolving industry, and wearables helping people achieve healthier and happier lives.


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