This smart bra can detect early signs of breast cancer

The iTBra is being trialled at Ohio State and Stanford universities
Smart bra detects breast cancer signs

A smart bra, known as the iTBra, is being developed to fight against breast cancer. Connected patches are designed to be worn inside the bra and can detect early signs of cancer at home, without the need for mammograms or ultrasound screenings.

Read this: The real Wonderbra helping women with breast cancer

The bra, which is at a prototype stage, uses heat sensors to measure the woman's circadian temperature changes within breast cells and then sends this data to the wearer's smartphone or PC. A breast cancer examination could be completed by wearing the device for 12 hours, while you go about your day, but the range is between two and 24 hours.

The data is then analysed by algorithms and neural networks which identify and categorise abnormal temperature and other cellular patterns.

The company behind the iTBra, Cyrcadia Health, is now trialling the system with the Ohio State University and the Medicine X group at Stanford. This is because this technological method of detecting early signs of breast cancer remains untested and so Cyrcadia Health needs the studies to back up its system.

So far it has already been tested on 500 patients in which it proved to be 87% accurate, slightly higher than mammograms at 83%.

The iTBra was also the subject of a documentary titled Detected which screened at SXSW 2015. We'll keep you up to date if and when the iTBra makes it out of clinical trials and into production.

1 Comment

  • Norma says:

    Another new lucrative gadget for the corrupt medical business to produce profits from their harmless useless merchandise arsenal.

    Here the use the same old false mantra "early detection saves lives" they've been using for mammography for decades despite the fact that there is marginal, if any, reliable evidence that mammography reduces mortality from breast cancer in a significant way in any age bracket (only the medical business-fabricated pro-mammogram "scientific" data wants you to believe otherwise) but a lot of solid evidence shows the procedure does provide more serious harm than serious benefit (read: Peter Gotzsche's 'Mammography Screening: Truth, Lies and Controversy' and Rolf Hefti's 'The Mammogram Myth').

    Most women are fooled by the misleading medical mantra that early detection by mammography saves lives simply because the public has been fed ("educated" or rather brainwashed) with a very one-sided biased pro-mammogram set of information circulated by the big business of mainstream medicine.

    Because of this one-sided promotion and marketing of the test by the medical business, women have been obstructed from making an "informed choice" about its benefits and risks which have been inaccurately depicted by the medical industry, favoring their business interests.

    Operating and reasoning based on this false body of information is the reason why very few women understand, for example, that a lot of breast cancer survivors are victims of harm instead of receivers of benefit. Therefore, almost all breast cancer "survivors" blindly repeat the official medical hype and nonsense.

    The fraud of conventional medicine is also apparent here where this bra uses the very technology, thermography, advocated by "alternative" medicine for years but that the medical industry has been ridiculing and dismissing as non-scientific...

    IF........ women (and men) at large were to examine the mammogram data above and beyond the information of the mammogram business cartel (eg American Cancer Society, National Cancer Institute, Komen), they'd also find that it is almost exclusively the big profiteers of the test, ie. the "experts," (eg radiologists, oncologists, medical trade associations, breast cancer "charities" etc) who promote the mass use of the test and that most pro-mammogram "research" is conducted by people with massive vested interests tied to the mammogram industry.

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