Flow is a wearable air pollution tracker that might help you live longer

CES 2017: Keep breathing the good stuff
Flow is a wearable air pollution tracker

The topic of air quality is gradually creeping more into the smart home, but at CES 2017 Plume Labs has revealed an air pollution tracker you can actually wear.

The Flow is a tracker that monitors exposure to air pollution, inside and out, and helps you try to avoid it. The small memory stick-like dongle attaches to bags or clothing and tracks pollution as you travel, crowdsourcing this data with other devices to build a map of air quality for your city including danger-zone hotspots. So even if you don't follow the guidance yourself, you're helping others by just wearing it.

For urban dwellers, air pollution is a quiet but certain threat to health, with much of it caused by car emissions. Smart home devices like the Netatmo Home Coach now monitor quality of air in the home, but when you're outside it becomes more difficult to know whether you're breathing the good stuff or not.

Information captured by Flow is fed back to the smartphone app, but the device also offers glanceable info on air quality exposure via the 12 multi-coloured LEDs.

Over the last two years Plume Labs has worked with environmental researchers at Imperial College London and France's CNRS-LISA to make the Flow, which it claims tracks the entire spectrum of indoor and outdoor pollutants.

Romain Lacombe, CEO and co-founder of Plume Labs, said that the "dramatic health impact of unclean air is becoming even more clear right now", making the conversation around air quality more essential than ever. After all, studies have already found a connection between clean air and longer lives.

The Flow will launch later this year, with a price yet to be announced.


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