Cute Circuit's graphene dress changes colour based on the wearer's breathing

An emotion sensing little black dress
An emotion sensing graphene dress

Cute Circuit is raising the fashion tech game again. The London studio just unveiled its latest tech-infused dress, commissioned by shopping centre owner intu, in Manchester. The intu little black dress is made, in part, from graphene - everyone's favourite ultra thin, light and strong wonder material - and features a breathing sensor which powers LED lights.

The idea is that the lights on the smart garment change colour depending on the wearer's emotions, analysed from how fast or slow they are breathing.

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The use of graphene (as well as crine, a woven nylon) is crucial to the whole set up as the material has really, really high electrical conductivity. It's also used in conductive inks and paints for the same reason.

The location of the launch at the Trafford Centre, Manchester is no coincidence either; it was scientists at the University of Manchester who first isolated/created the single atom thick material in 2004 and the city's National Graphene Institute worked with intu and Cute Circuit on this project.

One of Cute Circuit's points of focus over the years has been displaying the user's emotions in creative ways using smart dresses. Francesca Rosella and Ryan Gentz have designed connected LED uniforms for Easyjet as well as interactive glowing catsuits and costumes for Katy Perry, Nicole Scherzinger and other celebs.

We've seen this trend for emotion tracking in high fashion over the past few months. Hussein Chalayan and Intel collaborated on stress tracking smartglasses at last season's Paris Fashion Week and Safilo Group, the makers of designer glasses and sunglasses for Dior and Fendi, showed off its Muse-powered, emotion tracking specs at CES. Whether this sort of smart dress makes its way to the mainstream Instagram and SnapChat crowd, remains to be seen.

Source: The Guardian

CuteCircuit's graphene dress changes colour based on the wearer's breathing


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