Uno Noteband is the first dedicated Spritz wearable device

UPDATE: Speed reading wearable device has hit its target on Indiegogo
Uno Noteband is the Spritz wearable

Spritz, the quick reading app that we saw debut on the Samsung Gear 2 back in March, is to be baked into its own dedicated wearable - the Uno Noteband. A device that has just smashed its $50,000 target on Indiegogo.

The idea behind the Noteband is simple, it acts as a notifier on your wrist, letting you speed read whatever messages you choose to see. The aim is to stop you taking your phone out of your pocket unnecessarily.

Spritz can let you read at rates of 250 to 1,000 words per minute, with its makers claiming "the more you practice, the faster you will go, the smoother the reading will seem and the higher your retention will be".

According to Reading Soft, only 1% of readers go above 1000 words per minute, with the average rate around 200 wpm with a typical comprehension of 60%.

The Uno Noteband packs an OLED display and we're told that the battery lasts for several days. You can't reply to messages, it's simply designed to keep you updated. The usual array of notifications - texts, emails, calendar reminders, Facebook, Twitter and the like - are all on offer and it's also capable of picking up messages from PlayStation Network, Xbox Live and Steam.

The gaming aspect is somewhat unsurprising given that the company's founder and CEO Mark Long was the boss at Zombie Studios for over 17 years.

The Uno Noteband also packs in fitness tracker skills and there's even a claim to "the world's smallest and accurate accelerometer". Statistics will be compatible with both Google Fit and Apple Health.

The Uno Noteband launch site is live, and when we originally ran this story in November a price of $99 was given. The Indiegogo page now states an RRP of $129. However, early backers can grab one for $69, with shipping expected in April. The Indiegogo campaign runs until 6 January 2015.


  • Data says:

    Even in their promo video, you could tell that it was awkward for him to turn his wrist enough for the screen to be horizontal and reading to be comfortable.  Make it go long ways down your arm (without looking ridiculous), add a hr sensor that works, up the battery life to a week, and I'm sold!  Is that too much to ask? :P

  • zosa says:

    I'll second Data's comment. Why do the designers keep getting this wrong?

  • tomtiki says:

    If you rotate the band so that the display is on the palm side, it would be very easy to read. It would also prevent scratches from bumping the device into walls or other objects.

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