The best smart scale: Our top Wi-Fi connected body fat analysers

Shed some pounds with the latest Wi-Fi connected bathroom scales
The best smart bathroom scale

Buying a smart scale from the likes of Withings or iHealth is one of the best ways to keep track of your health goals. A whitepaper by Withings has shown that those who track their weight regularly are more likely to succeed in hitting their weight goal, and there's a plethora of devices on the market to help.

A top body analyser will track your weight, body fat and even heart rate, plotting your progress on your smartphone, so you can get a feel-good buzz about shedding the pounds.

Read our round-up: Best fitness trackers

However, buying a smart scale isn't just about the bit of plastic or glass you stand on. It's also about the ecosystem that tracks your weight and how useful the information can be. Read on for our round-up of the best out there.

Garmin Index Smart Scale

The new Garmin Index scale is one of the most complete scales out there, with both Bluetooth and ANT+ connectivity built in, which means it can pair with your smartphone and fitness watches such as the Fenix 3. It measures weight, body mass index, body fat and muscle mass and have them added to the Garmin Connect platform, which is superb for runners and users of Garmin's sports watches. The Index scale will also support up to 16 different profiles.

$149.99 garmin.com | Amazon

Polar Balance

Polar's smart scale supports up to 10 individual profiles, and will keep a log of weight and body mass index (BMI) within the Polar Flow app. It works using Bluetooth Smart to link to a paired smartphone or Polar Loop band, which will show you progress against your weight goal. It's lacking some of the metrics you get with the Garmin and Withings and won't display body fat percentage or muscle mass data.

$107.99, polar.com | Amazon

Under Armour

Available primarily as part of the Under Armour Health Box, which comes with a fitness tracking band and heart rate monitor, the scale is a standard affair which isn't as comprehensive as its rivals. It tracks weight and body fat percentage and can recognise up to 8 different users. The data syncs into Under Armour's impressive app ecosystem and it can be tracked with MapMyFitness and MyFitnessPal as well as UA Record.

$400, underarmour.com

Withings Body Cardio

Like the majority of smart scales, the Withings Body Cardio measures weight, BMI, body composition (fat, muscle, water and bone mass) and standing heart rate, tracking each within the Withings Health Mate app.

This brand new scale, goes one further, and adds Pulse Wave Velocity (PWV), which the company claims is a key indicator of hypertension. PWV is a measurement of heartbeat-generated vibrations and can sniff out stiff arteries or high blood pressure.

Withings also boasts that its scale works on carpet as well as hard flooring, something that would throw off its older Smart Body Analyzer.

If all those stats don't impress you, you can pick up a simplified version called the Withings Bodysmart scale, which still reports into the Withings app but ditches the PWV metrics for a more wallet-friendly $129.95.

$179.95, withings.com

Fitbit Aria

The Aria was launched back in 2012 and remains one of the most reliable and informative health gadgets, offering accurate stats about weight, BMI and fat percentages for up to eight registered users.

The scale is a good-looking wedge of glass available in black or white. The backlit display flashes a range of data including identification, weight, body fat percentage and lets you know when uploading over Wi-Fi is successful.

As a standalone set of scales the Withings WS-50 offers more, but combined with one of Fitbit's budget fitness trackers – the Zip costs just £49.99 - you can create a complete health monitoring system for not much more money. In theory the more you exercise the better your BMI, fat and weight stats should read. It's basic cause and effect and the Fitbit app realises this beautifully.

The app (or dashboard software if you prefer) is easy to navigate and after a few weeks the weight/BMI graphs will start to make useful, rather than daunting reading. For a complete assessment of your eating and exercising habits there's also a food diary log, and to keep you motivated you can sign up to compete with friends and boast about triumphs (or not) via social media.

$123.27, fitbit.com | Amazon

iHealth Core

The iHealth Core measures more than just your weight, adding muscle, bone, water and into the mix with bioimpedence tech, as well as BMI and all the usual data. Supporting up to 10 users, it feeds into the growing iHealth ecosystem and records and tracks data within the ByVitals app. The company also builds glucose monitoring and blood pressure devices, making it a top competitor for Withings' excellent health monitoring devices.

$129.99 iHealth | Amazon

Wahoo Balance

Another Bluetooth 4.0 device, this time for iOS users only (iPhone 4s and above), but the Balance looks good and syncs quickly with the Wahoo Wellness app. It tracks weight and BMI, and has the option for 16 different profiles and weight goals and handily it stores up to 130 weights so you don't have to have your phone with every time you weigh in.

The Wellness app offers the usual collection of graphs and goal alerts, but handily it can also sync your weight data with the superb calorie counting, exercise logging MyFitnessPal range of apps. Wahoo isn't unique with this – Fitbit and Withings both offer the same data sharing – but for the price it is a great extra to have.

$112.99, wahoofitness.com | Amazon

10 Comments

  • maslacak says:

    Smart bathroom scales are one of the best ways to keep track of your health and monitor your fitness goals. Scales that measure body fat do this by sending a low electrical current through one foot and reading the current with a sensor under the other foot. The current passes through fat more slowly and the scale calculates the amount of resistance to come up with a body fat percentage. The accuracy of these body fat measurements should be taken with a grain of salt as they can be inconsistent and inaccurate at times. Here is another good comparison of top smart scales:

    http://bit.ly/1FwE56c

  • HFGEnthousiast says:

    I am impressed with the Withings scale – it simply does the job. Having this scale in the bathroom means you can make it a part of your morning ritual, allowing you to track your weight every day, at roughly the same time, in the same state of undress, with no hassle. Once you’ve got it configured for your wireless network and set up the users, it just goes about its work simply enough.

    The fat % monitoring can sometimes vary, but this is the case with all such scales on the market. There are however few truly accurate ways of fat percentage monitoring outside clinics/hospitals where you are submersed in water! If you love gadgets and find tracking your weight useful to help you diet or maintain a healthy weight, the Withings scale is an excellent option. Here is a good article comparison the different scales available at the moment: http://bit.ly/1LUp7go

    • iceMan says:

      My Withings Smart Analyzer has given me fits through the year and a half or so that I've owned it. When it works, it is brilliant. However, for several months now I have not been able to get it to connect to my home WIFI -- even though it used to -- and it sporadically choses to not talk to my iPhone. When attempting to connect to the home WIFI, I get an error message that instructs me to reboot my router and ensure that it is configured to allow new devices. I have rebooted the router MANY times over the past few months in an attempt to make this work. We are able to connect new devices all the time. I am near my wits end. Withings customer service could not be much less helpful in resolving the matter. I am going to give it one more try today before punting the unit and trying something else. I arrived at this page looking for the Withings' replacement. The Garmin seems a likely candidate.

  • hmurchison says:

    I don't recommend anyone spend $150 for a scale.  I have owned two Withings scales.  I owned the first generation scale and then the second generation Bodyscale.   The body scale struggled to maintain a solid connection with my router despite being less than 10 feet away and thus churned through batteries.  It was also a bit flakey in recognizing me and my wife.  While I loved the ease of stepping on a scale and having the data pushed to the cloud the reality is these scales are 50$ scales with overpriced wifi AP built in. Today I own a $30 scale that has no wireless capabilities and I manually enter a paltry 3 digits.  Any health and fitness app can calculate your BMI for you.   No disrespect to Withings or any other connected health companies but fleecing users to the tune of 3x over comparable products because it's "Smart" is a dumb decision for consumers.  Two young children have re-centered what is important in my life.  I may opt for a Bluetooth (better and more efficient wireless tech to use) scale so long as it supports Apple Health.   Never again will I pay 300 % more because a tool has a smartphone app.  That being said the WiTscale looks good.

    • 3weelingeezer says:

      It is simple: Some people have more dollars than sense.  If someone will pay you 3x for a box with flashing gee-gaws and doo-dads, wouldn't you sell it to them?  People are lazy which is why they are fat in the first place.   They cannot be bothered to pick up a pencil and do a little math. 

  • yogibimbi says:

    Unless they come up with rollable scales that weigh less than 200 g, I am not much interested.

  • meyeonaise says:

    What about the Mi Scale? I paid only 33 Euros for it. Works fine with Mi Band App.

    • j.stables says:

      With the Mi Scale not officially supported in US/UK Mi Store, I wasn't confident that it would be supported in the English app. Certainly sounds like a good buy, when we tested the Mi Band before it was officially supported everything was in Chinese which wasn't terribly helpful. Good to hear you recommend it, though.

      • meyeonaise says:

        The Mi App for IOS is available in English..the Android one in German too.

        The description of the scale is in Chinese but this is no problem because you can pair it via the App. The switch at the bottom of the scale is tristate. You can switch to kg/pounds/chinese weight. Only the description of this switch is in chinese which is a little bit confusing the first time.

  • JBlake says:

    I really love the way index smart scale is emphasised here. I feel Index Smart Scale is definitely a revolutionary product when it comes to the machines that really helps to stay fitter and healthy! This very product measures the metrices involving weight, body fat and water ration, muscle and bone mass, along with BMI.

    Quick and user-friendly setup are the improved qulairty of this smart scale. Modern design with bright display (LCD) would really be a bonus for you. 

What do you think?

Connect with Facebook, Twitter, or just enter your email to sign in and comment.