How to give a fitness tracker this Christmas without insulting anyone

Essential do’s and don'ts for buying fitness trackers as gifts for friends and family
How to give a fitness tracker for Xmas

You've found the best fitness tracker in your budget. You've picked out both novelty and hipster Christmas wrapping paper. But how to give the gift of wearable-fuelled potential health and happiness without hurting any feelings? It's easier than you think, just follow these instructions.

DO get yourself the same one

Tell them you're being selfish, really. Tell them you need a friend to team up with. You need any motivation you can get. You might get ill/die/never have sex again unless they accept this gift and kickstart a new era of peer pressure based on burn, not beer. The good kind of peer pressure.

When in doubt, bulk buy. With messages of encouragement on Fitbit and gentle competitiveness in the Jawbone app, we're all in this self-improvement game together and you just didn't want to leave anyone out.

DON'T remind anyone that they've failed to get fit

“I noticed you talked the talk about getting fit in the summer. But you don't seem to have actually done anything. Here's a Now That's What I Call Fitness DVD with some spraytanned perma-smilers telling you to shake your hips plus a Microsoft Band 2 to remind you of your complete and utter failure to stop bingeing on Game of Thrones and KitKats."

Come on now, your mum deserves a bit more respect. It's Christmas.

Withings Activité Steel is official

DO buy stylish

This one's getting easier. Most truly stylish wearables function as buzzing jewellery that doesn't really serve any fitness tracking purpose. The exquisite exception to that rule is the Withings Activité Steel. It looks like a small, svelte regular watch but tracks steps, distance, calories and sleep just as well as any candy-coloured, chunky plastic fitness band.

Wareable picks: The best fitness tracker

Alternatively try the Fossil Q Reveler and watch your hipster bro swoon over the classic styling then casually show him how to download the accompanying activity app. Keep things real nonchalant, like it's an afterthought. Give him two weeks and he'll be bombarding you with screenshots of his daily stats and dream diaries in a bizarre case of reverse stalkery.

DO remind them of a conversation you (maybe) once had

We guarantee you will be able to recall - or easily fabricate - a conversation that can form the basis of your actually quite thoughtful gift. Like so.

“Remember in 2007 you said 'I wish I had a new watch'? Well here it is!" The retro chic Pebble Time Round with added fitness features from Jawbone or Misfit, take your pick.

Infinitely preferable to: “Remember that time you ate too many blue Smarties? Such a classic festive memory. I got you a Jawbone UP Move in the same colour so you can work them all off."

DO talk about the non-fitness elements

Smartwatches with fitness features, especially, are awesome all-round gifts. They tell the time! You can get Mario or James Bond watchfaces! You can skip Spotify tracks, track your heart rate and read your emails all on your wrist!

See what we did there? There's a world of both useful and fun features to point out to giftees during that crucial ten second post-unwrap, pre-reaction stage.

DON'T target your chubbiest friends or family

You're in a group. Say a Secret Santa swap or the Christmas Day lull just after mince pies. You hand a shiny Fitbit Charge HR or Jawbone UP3 to the family member with what you reckon to be the highest BMI in the room, if not the county. Everyone else gets chocolates and boxsets. You may as well have shouted 'Shame! Shame!' at them in your best Christopher Lee voice while they were tucking in.

New Misfit Shine 2 lands

DO highlight niche features

It really is the thought that counts. Nose around the unique features of fitness trackers and you'll find plenty of specs to target your lucky friends. Like the fact that the waterproof Misfit Shine 2 can be worn while doing lengths - perfect for keen swimmers and flatmates who take long baths.

This is where you can point to expert fitness tracker reviews and really dig into what the tech can do. Focus on the geeky data gathering and impressive hardware over the fact you're essentially trying to overhaul your mate's entire lifestyle.

DON'T forget to check what phone they use

Less a wearable gifting etiquette point, more a gentle warning. It's so incredibly annoying getting excited about a wearable then realising it's iOS only and won't work with your Samsung (or vice versa) that we wouldn't wish this on anyone come Christmas morning.

This could easily trigger the kind of stress that comes from realising there aren't enough roast potatoes for everyone's dinner, five hours earlier than is traditional. Give the gift of checking.

5 Comments

  • lane01 says:

    No insults here, It is exactly what I asked Santa for, can't wait to receive mine!

  • pkissel says:

    Unlike your FitBit marketing centered piece (that I complained about the other day), I felt this article really brought something new to the table.  Thanks for sharing these great ideas!

    • s.charara says:

      Glad to see we won you over! Fyi we do tips and tricks pieces and buying guides for all the major wearable tech brands, not just Fitbit. 

  • GetWellable says:

    It's probably worth looking at a survey to determine what people want and incorporating that into the gift giving process.  According to a recent survey by the CTA, 74% of online American adults are likely to purchase health and fitness technology in the next 12 months. Of this group, one in three (35%) plan to buy a smartwatch, which leads the category over fitness apps (30%) and wearable fitness devices (27%). http://blog.wellable.co/2015/12/14/survey-74-of-online-american-adults-likely-to-purchase-health-and-fitness-technology/

  • Watsonndh says:

    I received an UP2 for Christmas, and I'm loving it!  However, I'm concerned that it fits too tightly on my wrist.  My wrists are not oversized!  Yet, I struggle putting it on & taking it off.  It is so tight on my arm that it almost hurts, and surely leaves indentations on my wrist.  I can see no way to adjust it.  Am I the only person with this issue?  What is the solution?

What do you think?

Connect with Facebook, Twitter, or just enter your email to sign in and comment.